233rd AAS Meeting, Seattle WA

233rd AAS Meeting, Seattle WA
Please read:

Registration steps:

  1. Sign in if you're not already logged in. Then click "Register Myself."
  2. Review and approve your badge. Click the pencil icon below the "Cancel My Registration" button to access your name and organization/affiliation information. Click "Save & Close" when you're done.
    • Important: Please verify that this information is correct. This is what will be printed on your badge.
    • Important: Please do not put your last name in the Informal name field.
  3. Select your registration option.
    • The registration rates are based on your current membership status; however, if you renew a lapsed membership and register for a meeting on the same day, you will be charged the nonmember registration rate. To register at the member rate, please wait until the following business day to register for the meeting and confirm you have been charged the correct fee before checking out.
    • Registration options for which you are ineligible are hidden.
    • Your eligibility will be reviewed if you select the student, emeritus, local educator, or amateur astronomer options.
    • If you select a one-day option, you will only be allowed in the meeting space on that day.
  4. Click "Save/Update Responses" before you select your program options and checkout.
  5. Add your program options and modify the quantity if needed.
  6. Use the "Update" and "Remove" buttons to change the quantity or remove an option.
  7. If you have a guest, please select "Add a guest" below the "Cancel My Registration" button. Guests are $60 each, and have access to the Exhibit Hall, and Opening and Closing Receptions.

All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered for the AAS meeting at which the workshop will take place. Those attending a workshop only and not the rest of the AAS meeting will be charged a one-day registration fee in addition to the individual workshop fee.

When
1/6/2019 - 1/10/2019
Where
Washington State Convention and Trade Center
705 Pike Street
Seattle, WA 98101 United States

Sign In

Program

   

Sunday, 07 January 2018

 
Astronomical surveys of cosmological populations are imperfect. Measurements of properties of astronomical objects (stars, galaxies, planets) often have significant uncertainties. Populations are seldom completely or fairly sampled due to selection effects. Hierarchical Bayesian models (also known as multilevel models, or probabilistic graphical models) account for such complications by "forward" or "generative" modeling---building a predictive model for the data by composing probability distributions describing the population, and the various parts of the data generating process (e.g., detection/selection, and noisy measurement). The techniques of Bayesian data analysis may then be used to "invert" the model, inferring population properties from the data. This workshop will present a mixture of lectures and hands-on demonstrations teaching the basics of hierarchical Bayes in astrophysical contexts. Topics covered will include: Quick intro to Bayesian inference; hierarchical Bayes for estimating distributions and correlations with noisy data; handling selection effects; and computational techniques including Markov chain Monte Carlo and Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). Demonstrations will present examples using Python (via Jupyter notebooks), R, and the Stan probabilistic programming language (via PyStan). The main presenters will be astronomer Tom Loredo (Cornell) and statistician Jessi Cisewski (Yale). A Git repository (https://github.com/tloredo/AAS231-CosmicPopulations) will host material for the workshop and provide preparation instructions for participants.
Time
9:30 AM - 4:30 PM
9:30 AM
Everyday Anti-Racism is a workshop designed for department chairs, faculty, group leaders and mentors. In this workshop, we will equip attendees with tools to best support students and other early career astronomers of color in their institutions. The workshop itself will consist of a discussion led by members of the Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy, followed by a series of break-out sessions where participants will discuss and resolve case studies and scenarios. Solutions and advice for their implementation of those solutions will be discussed in a small-group setting and within the larger group as a whole. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Monday, 08 January 2018

 
It is widely recognized that a new generation of skills are required to excel in astronomy research today: Python, databases, version control, application programming interfaces (APIs) to data, machine learning, and more. In addition, open science and collaboration tools are becoming increasingly essential to an international, engaged astronomy community. Instructors who do not encourage their students to develop skills in these areas put them at a disadvantage relative to their peers. While several workshops, such as SciCoder and Software Carpentry, are available for early-career astronomers, this workshop is designed for the astronomy instructor who has not had the time or means to stay up to date with the latest technology developments. A "lay of the land" of astronomy data science and collaboration tools will be presented, detailing the most important skills students should learn. .Attendees will be provided with a basic introduction to many topics to demonstrate their benefit to students' productivity and research as well as gain a familiarity for themselves. Exercises will be given in a hand-on, interactive environment. Materials and a general roadmap will be provided that may be used as a starting point to create a curriculum. This workshop is based on the lectures developed by Demitri Muna for the SciCoder workshop which has been run annually since 2010, Katie Mack's expertise and widely recognized success in science communication and open science, and Alex Hagen's education, outreach, and collaborative software development experience. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
9:00 AM
This workshop will cover the use of Python tools for astronomical data analysis and visualization, with the focus primarily on tools in the Astropy library and its affiliated packages. The goal is to introduce participants to the variety of tools which are available inside the Astropy library and to provide ample hands-on time during which participants will explore the science analysis capabilities which the greater Python environment and community provide. The format will be very interactive and include short presentations followed by instructor-guided tutorials where participants will use the tools be able to ask questions in the company of expert users and developers. Topics will include user configuration and conda environments; units, quantities, and constants; FITS, ASCII, and Astropy tables; point-source photometry; and data exploration and visualization. Instructions on installing the necessary software will be provided before and during the workshop, however those attending should make every effort to install the software ahead of time. Some basic Python experience is highly recommended to be able to effectively participate in the exercises. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
9:00 AM
This workshop is aimed at instructors who are working toward or looking to create learning environments that are inclusive, supportive, and rigorous, where diverse perspectives are represented, and students and faculty can thrive. Topics addressed are drawn from the Inclusive Astronomy recommendations for teaching and include: (1) identifying the strengths, weaknesses, needs, and resources our students bring to the classroom, including cultural capital (2) techniques for understanding and influencing classroom climate and dynamics, and (3) creating an affirming and accessible physical space. We will learn from each other's teaching experiences as well as literature, and discuss structural and pedagogical practices that can help us advance toward these goals. The teaching practices presented will be research-informed and research-validated, with evidence of equitable outcomes for all intersections of student identities in terms of psychosocial shifts and academic success. Resources provided will include examples of: syllabus evaluation tools, classroom codes of conduct and "ground rules," literature on social justice pedagogy, and formative and summative assessment tools. By the end of the workshop, participants will identify concrete changes they can make in their courses or departments and create an implementation and assessment plan. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
10:30 AM - 3:30 PM
10:30 AM
Working with a national collaboration of astronomy educators and researchers at a range of institution types (R1, SLAC, Community College), we have developed a suite of new active learning materials to support incorporating an authentic research experience into the Astro 101 classroom. The in-class activities and group research experience engage the students in citizen science through Zooniverse projects and employ custom extensions to Google sheets for a student-friendly exploration of data collection and manipulation and the basics of data analysis and interpretation, all while addressing core Astro 101 topics. This workshop is based upon work supported by the NSF under the award NSF-IUSE 1524189. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
1:00 PM
Graduate school is tough, and those at the intersection of one or more marginalized identities may find it especially difficult to navigate "majority" academic environments. For instance, research studies such as "Double Jeopardy? Gender Bias Against Women of Color in Science" (Williams, Phillips, and Hall 2014) demonstrate that women of color experience the compounded effects of racism and sexism. Moreover, an internalized sense of inferiority from immersion in a homogenous field of study can be detrimental to the mental health of marginalized groups. In this workshop, marginalized students will discover tools for self-care and productivity tailored to their needs for success in grad school. The CSMA and Board of Trustees are pleased to sponsor this workshop and will waive the fees for participation. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
2:00 PM
We invite all to attend this hands-on, DIY workshop to create your own Zooniverse project for free, in an afternoon. Processing our increasingly large datasets poses a bottleneck for producing real scientific outcomes. Citizen science - engaging the public in research - provides a solution, particularly when coupled with machine learning algorithms. Zooniverse is the most widely used and successful citizen science platform, with over 1.6 million volunteers worldwide and over 70 active projects across the disciplines resulting in over 120 peer-reviewed publications. Faced with a rapidly growing demand for citizen science projects, Zooniverse launched a "Project Builder" which allows you, the researcher, to build your own crowd-sourced research project using the Zooniverse infrastructure and tools. Through this hands-on workshop, you will be able to build your own Zooniverse project. We will also share best practices for engaging with our Zooniverse volunteer community. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
3:00 PM
Is DC your first AAS Meeting? Are you looking for a Graduate or Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program? Are you overwhelmed by the AAS Meeting? Or are you looking to connect with other students and faculty? Then the Student Orientation Grad School Fair is for you! When you register, make sure to sign up for this fun and informative event.
Time
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
5:30 PM

Tuesday, 09 January 2018

 
Working with a national collaboration of astronomy educators, we have developed a suite of new active learning materials that bring to life the methods used in multiwavelength astronomy and interferometry. Come engage in a fun and supportive environment designed to help you successfully engage learners about these important astronomical methods. Participants will come away with field-tested instructional materials and assessment strategies that are ready to use in the Astro 101 classroom. Presenters will be Edward Prather and Gina Brissenden (Center for Astronomy Education, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona), who encourage you to bring your lunch! We would like to thank NASA's Univ. of Learning and JPL for their support. This workshop is based upon work supported by NASA under award number NNX16AC65A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Time
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
12:30 PM
The vast public database of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging, photometry, and spectra can be used to facilitate authentic explorations in astronomy, computing, and the concepts of "big data", for learners of all ages. This workshop will provide an overview of the freely available educational resources for interacting with SDSS data. We will demonstrate a variety of inquiry-based activities appropriate for students across a wide range of educational levels (middle school through advanced undergraduate), with a focus on the following: 1) SDSS Voyages (http://voyages.sdss.org)- The primary SDSS educational portal, Voyages offers tutorials for querying and visualizing SDSS data, as well as a wide range of activities suitable for students aged 12 and above. Voyages is also now available in Spanish (http://voyages.sdss.org/es). 2) SciServer (http://www.sciserver.org/) - New cloud-based tools enable the visualization and analysis of SDSS and other large datasets, without the need of any locally installed software beyond a web browser. We will demonstrate how SciServer's web-based Jupyter notebooks can be used as a framework for a variety of undergraduate-level educational explorations at the intersection of astronomy, data science, and computing. A subset of lesson plans will be provided for educators looking to introduce python-based explorations of SDSS data in their college labs. 3) Plates for Education - Retired spectroscopic plug plates from the SDSS make effective tools for communicating the engineering principles behind large astronomy surveys. We will provide a tutorial on how to use an SDSS plug plate for effective student learning and engagement, and explain how your institution or organization may be able to adopt your own piece of the SDSS sky. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
12:30 PM
In recent years, inclusion and diversity have become significant and widespread topics of conversation in our society. These ideals are something to strive for within departments in universities and institutions. This is particularly true for Astronomical institutions. Excellence in Astronomy means diversity and inclusion. Diverse and inclusive teams lead to collective achievements that are greater and more extraordinary than the sum of their individual contributions. Increasing diversity and building an inclusive culture is key for breaking down barriers across race, gender, ethnicity, and ability. Diverse and inclusive institutions also encourage individuals in under-represented groups to continue pursuing their passion in Astronomy, increasing the retention rate of gifted individuals in the field. Changing an institutional climate can be a daunting task, but a first step with an extraordinary impact can be as simple as posting a code of conduct in meeting rooms. In this workshop we, the professionals of the Space Telescope Science Institute, will share our own experiences in working towards a more equitable institution and will walk you through hands-on activities and break-out sessions designed to increase awareness of your identities and privileges, and translate that awareness into meaningful discussions about how we can all effect change at our home institutions. No one here is an expert on this subject, so we hope that we can all learn from each other. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
1:00 PM
Are you in the market for a career in astronomy? Thinking of making a change? Would you like to mentor an early career astronomer? Will your company be hiring in the near future? Then the Career Networking Reception is the place to be. Network with employers and potential employees. Learn about the many career services offered by the AAS, especially those offered onsite at the 231st AAS Meeting. Employers will have a special opportunity to setup a table to meet and greet with attendees.
Time
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
6:30 PM

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

 
Been thinking about flipping your class? So have we! Working with a national collaboration of astronomy educators we have developed a suite of active learning materials that can be used during the freed-up class time the flipped classroom offers. Come engage in a fun and supportive environment designed to help you successfully motivate students to participate, facilitate student learning groups, assess student learning, and manage time in the flipped classroom. Participants will come away with instructional materials and assessment strategies ready for immediate classroom use. (Back by popular demand!!) Presenters will be Edward Prather and Gina Brissenden (Center for Astronomy Education, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona), who encourage you to bring your lunch! We would like to thank NASA's Univ. of Learning and JPL for their support. This workshop is based upon work supported by NASA under award number NNX16AC65A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring. All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered to attend the AAS conference at which the workshop is occurring.
Time
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
12:30 PM

Friday, 12 January 2018

 
Hack Together Day is a full-day workshop to work intensively on collaborative projects of interest to the Astronomical community. A wide variety of projects will be undertaken, spanning everything from software development to data exploration and analysis to creative outreach projects. Projects that take advantage of the unique gathering of enthusiasm and expertise at the Winter AAS Meeting are particularly encouraged. No hacking or programming experience is required; newcomers are extremely welcome! Project ideas and participants will be solicited before and during the meeting. Participants can lead or join any project, and should plan on focusing on accomplishing one, limited thing. In addition, we ask participants to commit to Hack Together Day for the entirety of the day. The registration link and more information can be found here: www.astrobetter.com/wiki/AASHackDay
Time
10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
10:00 AM

Saturday, 05 January 2019

 
AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Workshop: Resources & Techniques for Effective Outreach to Students & the Public - 2 day Workshop Saturday, 5 January| 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM & Sunday, 6 January|8:30 AM - 5:30 PM Organizer: Rick Fienberg, American Astronomical Society Fee: $0 - Application Required We invite advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and recent PhD's to join the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, established to support early-career AAS members interested in doing outreach to K-12 students, families, and the public. The program is offering a two-day workshop at the 233rd AAS meeting in Seattle, Washington, during which you will: * Learn strategies and techniques to improve your presentation skills; * Learn to communicate more effectively with public and school audiences; * Learn to reach your audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language; * Learn to find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with schools, museums, parks, and/or community centers in your area; * Gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings; * Become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach (with mentorship available); * Have up to two nights' lodging and two days' lunches provided. The workshop includes presenters from the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and the Pacific Science Center. Participants will include graduate students, postdocs, and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of their PhD, and advanced undergraduates doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy. Early-career astronomers who are interested in doing outreach, but who haven't done much yet, are encouraged to apply; we will have sessions appropriate for both those who have done some outreach already and those just starting their outreach adventures. We especially want to encourage the participation of members of groups that are underrepresented in science. If you're interested and are not yet a member of the AAS, you may submit a membership application at the same time you apply for the workshop and register for the meeting.
Time
1/5/2019 8:30 AM - 1/6/2019 5:30 PM
8:30 AM
The AAS Chandra/CIAO Workshop - 2 Day Workshop Saturday, 5 January| 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM & Sunday, 6 January|9:00 AM - 6:00PM Organizer: Antonella Fruscione, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Fee: $35 Chandra/CIAO workshops are aimed at helping users, especially graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and early-career researcher to work with Chandra data and the Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software. Several workshops have been previously organized at the Chandra X-Ray Center (see http://cxc.harvard.edu/ciao/workshop/ for more details) and this is the first time a CIAO workshop is organized in connection with the AAS. The workshop will feature talks on introductory and advanced X-ray data analysis, statistics, and topics in Chandra calibration. The workshop will also include hands-on sessions where students can practice X-ray data analysis following a workbook of CIAO exercises or perform their own analysis with members of the CIAO team ready to assist. Participants are required to bring their own laptop
Time
1/5/2019 9:00 AM - 1/6/2019 6:00 PM
9:00 AM
Introduction to Software Carpentry - 2 Day Workshop Saturday, 5 January| 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM & Sunday, 6 January|9:00 AM - 5:00PM Organizer: AAS Employment Committee Fee: $100 Computing is an integral part of every aspect of astronomy and astrophysics, but most scientists are never taught how to build, use, validate, and share software. As a result, many spend hours or days doing things badly that could be done well in just a few minutes. The goal of the Software Carpentry Workshop is to change that. The tools presented at this 2-day workshop will enable astronomers to spend less time wrestling with software and more time doing research with results that are easier to confirm, distribute, and update. This workshop consists of short tutorials alternating with hands-on practical exercises and covers the core software skills needed to construct, use, verify, and share software in astronomy. Saturday's tutorials will include shell automation, basic python programming, and code review. Sunday's sessions will shift to more advanced python, including numerical- and astronomy-oriented computing, and version control with git. The workshop will be run by a team certified instructors and helpers. The course is aimed at astronomers at all stages of their education and careers who wish to learn computational tools to increase the reproducibility and efficiency of their work. The course will be taught with the assumption that participants have written or edited code in a language other than Python and can navigate directories using the shell command line. Knowledge of Git is not required. Registration is for both days. Participants will be required to bring their own laptops and to install software in advance of the workshop. Approximately one month prior to the workshop, instructors will contact participants provide software requirements and collaborative troubleshooting. We encourage participants to apply their newly developed skills at the Hack Together Day. More information on the Software Carpentry project and the skills covered in the workshop can be found at http://software-carpentry.org.
Time
1/5/2019 9:00 AM - 1/6/2019 5:00 PM
9:00 AM
Using Python to Search NASA's Astrophysics Archives Saturday, 5 January|10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Organizer: Josh Peek, Space Telescope Science Institute Fee: $0 NASA's Astrophysics Archives preserve many terabytes of multiwavelength images, catalogs, and spectra. While many astronomers are familiar with the web tools that are convenient for searching and visualizing these data, this workshop will introduce participants to the command-line data access tools that are becoming increasingly popular. We will use python to work through science scenarios that combine multiwavelength data from the HEASEARC, IRSA, NED, and MAST. Workshop organizers will also be available to help participants access NASA data sets for use on their own projects.
Time
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
10:00 AM

Sunday, 06 January 2019

 
The onsite registration fee is automatically added to the late registration rates for last minute and onsite registrations.
Time
1/6/2019 - 1/10/2019
Over 90% of the carbon emissions from a typical scientific meeting come from participant travel to the meeting. We are encouraging participants to contribute up to $100 towards the purchase of carbon offsets, which will be used for a variety of third-party certified projects to reduce carbon emissions. Offsets are not a panacea, but will go a small way towards compensating for the meeting's carbon footprint.
SOFIA Workshop for FORCAST and HAWC+ Data Analysis Sunday, 6 January| 8:30 AM - 5:15 PM Organizer: Randolf Klein, USRA/SOFIA Fee: $35 The SOFIA Science Center offers an interactive workshop on SOFIA science data analysis. The workshop participants will work on scientifically highly relevant, recently obtained, publicly available data sets. Far-infrared polarimetry observations of 30 Doradus with by HAWC+ have been obtained in in July 2018. Mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the galactic star forming regions DR21 and W3 with FORCAST are planned for September 2018. These data sets are obtained in strategic director's discretionary time and are made public immediately after the observation. The workshop participants will learn how to work with and analyze HAWC+ polarimetric data as well as FORCAST imaging and spectroscopic data. Data analysis recipes will be provided before the workshop. Instructions for downloading the public data sets from the SOFIA data archives will also be distributed. During the workshop the participants can follow along the demonstration of the data analysis recipes on their own laptops and then explore the data on their own. During the demonstration and while the participants are exploring the data in the interactive part of the workshop, SOFIA scientists will be at hand to help with questions. The goal of the workshop is to enable the community to work on SOFIA data from FORCAST and HAWC+ using the above mentioned public data sets and also to give the workshop participants a head start on analyzing these data sets. Workshop participants may try the demonstrated data analysis recipes on other, e.g. their own, data sets. The support at the workshop will focus on the analysis of the public data sets. Only limited support will be available for participant with issues specific to other data sets. For any questions about the workshop, please contact sofia_help@sofia.usra.edu.
Time
8:30 AM - 5:15 PM
8:30 AM
CAE's Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors Sunday, 6 January| 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Organizer: Edward Prather, University of Arizona Fee: $35 Want to motivate students to become active participants in their learning? So do we! Developed over the past 15 years by working with thousands of instructors, postdocs, and graduate students, this workshop provides current and future instructors with authentic experiences in effectively implementing proven active learning strategies that significantly increase students' understanding. We will introduce participants to a wide variety of classroom-tested instructional techniques and materials that motivate and empower students to engage in learning about the big ideas in Astronomy and Space Science. This inclusive, supportive and active workshop environment provides first-hand experience with a range of instructional strategies including interactive lecturing, Think-Pair-Share, and collaborative group activities (including, Lecture-Tutorials, Ranking Tasks, and Student Representation Tasks). These instructional strategies are designed to increase students' conceptual understandings as well as help them develop and improve their abilities to think critically, interpret graphs, reason about quantitative data, and improve their self-efficacy. Join your colleagues in learning more about how to transform your classroom into a vibrant learning environment with more motivated and confident learners! We at CAE are continually evolving our professional development experiences based on the needs and recommendations of our workshop participants. If it's been a while since you participated in one of our Teaching Excellence Workshops, we encourage you to come take part in this new experience! CAE workshops have been hosted all around the country at universities, colleges, and national meetings of professional societies (such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers). By participating, you'll become part of a nationwide community of practice, along with over 4000 past workshop participants and other educators of Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science. Our CAE on-line community of practice is dedicated to helping each other in a supportive online environment through advice and recommendations, as well as conversations about effective classroom strategies, interesting pedagogical resources, current science education research, and more
Time
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
9:00 AM
Using Python and Astropy for Astronomical Data Analysis Sunday, 6 January| 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Organizer: Kelle Cruz, ScienceBetter Consulting Fee: $75 This workshop will cover the use of Python tools for astronomical data analysis and visualization, with the focus primarily on tools in the Astropy library and its affiliated packages. The goal is to introduce participants to the variety of tools which are available inside the Astropy library and to provide ample hands-on time during which participants will explore the science analysis capabilities which the greater Python environment and community provide. The format will be very interactive and include short presentations followed by instructor-guided tutorials where participants will use the tools be able to ask questions in the company of expert users and developers. Topics will include user configuration and conda environments; units, quantities, and constants; coordinates; FITS, ASCII, and Astropy tables; models; WCS and images; and point-source photometry. Finally, we will describe the various ways to get help from the Astropy community and ways to get involved with the Astropy Project.
Time
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
9:00 AM
Adding LISA to your Astronomy Tool Box Sunday, 6 January| 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Organizer: Shane Larson, CIERA - Northwestern University Fee: $35 If you're interested in the power of adding gravitational waves to your research, this hands on work shop is for you. LISA will be a phenomenal astronomical observatory with a variety of sources ranging from degenerate stellar binaries to supermassive black holes to the Big Bang. Experts from the community will show how LISA data can be used to address unanswered questions in astronomy, followed by hands on activities and exercises using publicly available gravitational-wave tools. These tools are designed for use individual research problems. The day will conclude with an introduction to the LISA Consortium and strategies to become part of the international LISA community. The workshop is open to astronomers at all stages of their careers from students to faculty. Laptops are required and a working python knowledge is suggested.
Time
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
9:00 AM
The success of scientists depends upon their ability to obtain funding. One of the largest challenges is to create strong proposals. Using Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) from NASA as a template, this workshop will focus on teaching the audience key points to writing a successful proposal. Session Goals: As a result of this session, participants will be able to understand the proposal writing, reviewing, and selection process for federally funded proposals, as well as help those who have previously submitted proposals improve their performance. Session Teaching and Learning Practices: Proposal Writing Workshops help early career scientists, as well as those looking to improve their previous proposal performance. However, workshops have been limited to due time constraints and the location of those willing to organize and run these critical workshops. Dr. Richey (the organizer/speaker), while a contractor at NASA Headquarters, was able to do some workshops during ROSES Roll-Outs, which occurred primarily at NASA Centers. That presentation will be modified to be attractive to a more diverse audience, and will include information on review techniques for program beyond just ROSES. The current presentation for the proposal writing workshops is 3-4 hours in length, with time for questions and interactive engagement from the audience, as literature shows that active learning environments are optimal (Review of Literature within the field by Prince, M. 2004). The workshop is a mixture of powerpoint, Q&A, and will include time for hands-on activities. An anonymized survey will be included at the end to allow for general feedback in improving the workshop."
Time
1:00 PM - 6:00 PM
1:00 PM
Join your colleagues as we kick-off the start of the 233rd AAS Meeting in Seattle. This is a great time to network, socialize, eat, drink and gear up for an exciting week.
Time
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
7:00 PM

Monday, 07 January 2019

 
One-on-One Career Consultations (20 Minute Sessions) Monday, 7 January| 12:00 PM - 4:40 PM Tuesday, 8 January| 9:00 AM - 5:54 PM Wednesday 9 January | 9:00 AM - 5:40 PM Organizer: Diane Frendak, American Astronomical Society Fee: $20 Alaina Levine of Quantum Success Solutions, a career consultant, science writer, professional speaker, and comedian, will meet individually with attendees to provide confidential, customized career advice for people from student through mid-career. Attendees are encouraged to bring CV/resume, cover letter, or any other item you wish to have evaluated. Registrants will be contacted starting 10 October by facilitator to schedule their individual appointment.
Time
1/7/2019 12:00 PM - 1/9/2019 5:40 PM
12:00 PM
Marvin: Data Access and Visualization for the SDSS-IV/MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey Monday, 7 January|1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Organizer: David Law, Space Telescope Science Institute Fee: $35 MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) is one of the three main surveys of the SDSS-IV program. MaNGA will provide integral field spectroscopy of an unprecedented sample of 10,000 galaxies. As part of SDSS, MaNGA data is being made public in annual data releases; DR15 is the third and most recent release of MaNGA data (and the first which includes maps of derived properties). DR15 also includes the release of Marvin to the public. Marvin is a new tool designed for streamlined access to the MaNGA data, optimized for overcoming the challenges of searching, accessing, and visualizing the complexity of the MaNGA dataset. At its core, Marvin provides user-unaware local/remote data access eliminating logistical overheads and delivering exactly the content you want, when you want it. Marvin has two main components: a Web Interface, for a quick visual introduction into the world of MaNGA data, and a Python package of tools, for more in-depth scientific analysis and inclusion in your science workflow. This workshop serves as an introduction to Marvin for the astronomical community, by members of the Marvin Team. After an introductory presentation about MaNGA and Marvin, we will guide you through the setup for Marvin, and demonstrate its main features. Using the web interface, participants will learn how to visually navigate, search for, and inspect MaNGA galaxies. Using Python, participants will learn the ins and outs of all the programmatic tools, how to quickly access data files, query the dataset, and deep-dive into a more detailed analysis with a focus towards specific science use cases. By the workshop end, participants will have gained familiarity with the Marvin tool suite to begin exploring the MaNGA dataset for their science immediately. A break for coffee will be provided.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Direct Connection to the Science with NASA's Universe of Learning: Ways to Use Astrophysics Science to Support STEM Learning Monday, 7 January| 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Organizer: Emma Marcucci, NASA's Universe of Learning Fee: $35 The NASA's Universe of Learning workshop at the 233rd AAS meeting is aimed at astronomers and educators who engage with audiences to enable STEM learning in informal learning environments - such as museums, science centers, planetariums, and libraries. During this workshop, we will provide a brief overview of the NASA's Universe of Learning program, do interactive tutorials with attendees on selected STEM activities, and share additional resources from the program. We will present ways to connect these resources based on current astrophysics themes and learning pathways, and introduce ways in which you can help us deliver current and accurate NASA astrophysics content to audiences across our country. NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven, learning-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is the result of a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University, and is one of 27 competitively-selected cooperative agreements within the NASA Science Mission Directorate's Science Activation Collective. The NASA's Universe of Learning team draws upon cutting-edge science and works closely with Subject Matter Experts (scientists and engineers) from across the NASA Astrophysics Physics of the Cosmos, Cosmic Origins, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. Together we develop and disseminate data tools and participatory experiences, multimedia and immersive experiences, exhibits and community programs, and professional learning experiences that meet the needs of our audiences, with attention to underserved and underrepresented populations.
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
2:00 PM
Teaching Astronomy with the Principles of BASE Learning Monday, 7 January| 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Organizer: Charles Liu, CUNY College of Staten Island Fee: $0 What's the point of lectures and tests when every fact can instantly be found with an Internet search? This short yet information-dense workshop offers to the AAS membership an introduction to the BASE Learning methodology of teaching astronomy and to its first release of related online educational resources (OER) that will be provided, free of charge, to all astronomy educators in the coming year. BASE is a slightly tongue-in-cheek acronym, "Better than A Search Engine," which represents a serious and significant change in the kinds of coursework and assessments in astronomy classrooms - especially traditional ones - that uses the vast power of the Internet as a time-saving and effort-saving resource (e.g., for active learning during class) rather than as a challenge (e.g., for cheating on exams), and create more meaningful and useful STEM learning outcomes for students. Workshop participants will receive instruction on BASE Learning teaching techniques and practice their application; they will then receive a set of BASE Learning materials, and become part of the BASE Learning user and development group that will continue to sustain and improve the BASE Learning infrastructure as OER distribution moves to full speed by the autumn of 2019. The bulk of the workshop material will be aimed at the teaching and learning of introductory college-level astronomy. AAS Student members and Affiliates are especially welcome. This workshop is supported by the City University of New York OER Grants Program and the AAS Education & Professional Development Grants Program.
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
2:00 PM

Thursday, 10 January 2019

 
Join us one last time to say farewell to your colleagues until the next time you meet at an AAS Meeting!
Time
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
5:30 PM

Date Not Specified

 
The Rodger Doxsey Travel Prize — established through the support of his father, John Doxsey, and other friends, family, and colleagues — provides graduate students or postdocs within one year of receiving or receipt of their PhD a monetary prize to enable the oral presentation of their dissertation research at a winter meeting of the AAS. Help us sustain this important prize with your gift of $25.00 to $100.
Not specified
A mobile app including the schedule of sessions and events, full abstracts, exhibitor listings, and much more information will be available for Android, iPhone, and through any web browser. If you would like to also receive a printed meeting program, please opt-in.
Not specified